Colonial Histories

A sideways look at the taxidermy tiger at Leeds City Museum

The Tiger Who Came to Leeds

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The tiger on display at Leeds City Museum is one of our most well-known and popular objects. Curator Clare explores its troublesome origins, and how it came to be in our collection.
A teacher is picking up and talking about some museum objects on a table. The children sitting around the table look very interested.

Decolonising the Curriculum

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Our learning team work closely with schools to shape, change and develop the curriculum, so that the pupils in our city are told whole and diverse stories at primary school.
A piece of cotton with a pink printed countryside scene, featuring 2 cows 2 people in old fashioned dress and a tree

Re-framing our Dress and Textile Collection: Everyday cotton

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Vanessa Jones explains how intrinsic slavery was in the production of cotton goods in the final post in our Re-framing the Dress and Textile Collection series.
A blue and purple printed textile with colonial figures

Re-framing our Dress and Textile Collection: A toile

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In the second blog post in our Re-framing the Collection series, Vanessa Jones explains how this historic textile shows the exploitation of African slaves and Native Americans in the aftermath of the American Revolution.

Re-framing our Dress and Textile Collection: Embroidered maps

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Many textile objects that reflect black history are historic pieces. In this blog, curator Vanessa explains why our embroidered maps are so closely linked with the transatlantic slave trade story.
A skeleton of a gorilla

Decolonisation and Natural Science Collections

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Objects in our collection were often discovered by people who aren't acknowledged in their descriptions. Rebecca Machin explores why, and what we need to do about it.
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